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Sep 30

A Few Words on Decor

Home dcor and design has never been so educational. An article from a popular magazine provided a list of dcor vocabulary that some people may or may not have encountered in the past. These words are commonly used by home designers and stylists, ranging from design methods to furniture. Here are some of them.

The word trug may sound like an action word but is actually a shallow basket made of wide strips of wood. Grommet is another term referring to an eyelet made of plastic, metal, or rubber that protects openings. It is used in crafts and reinforcements, and acts as wire managers for furniture.

Hearing the word cabriole is reminiscent of a home-cooked meal, but it is far from it. The word refers to a curved leg that supports furniture, curving convexly in the upper arc then concavely in the lower. Pounce is synonymous to springing up in an attempt to seize something, but in the vocabulary of dcor, it means to -transfer a stencil design-.

Bergre in design refers to an upholstered French armchair with exposed wood. It is meant for comfortable lounging and appeared in Paris during the Rgence, the French historical period from 1715 to 1723. Decorating Franklin TN homes with a bergre adds a vintage touch.

Incise is another word in the world of dcor and design meaning to engrave or cut into. Bauhaus refers to German design and craftsmanship influenced by the approach of a school in Germany that operated from 1919-1933, noted for its program that merges technology, craftsmanship, and aesthetics. Bauhaus style can be perfect for those who want to add a European feel for their Franklin TN condos.

A finial is an ornament usually found at the tip of a lamp or the ends of a curtain rod. Patina refers to the worn look of bronze or copper as a result of long exposure to air or acids. It gives a more classic look and adds to aesthetic appeal. These are a few words applicable for homeowners and designers who plan to decorate Franklin TN homes or simply improve their dcor vocabulary.

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